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JLEER View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote JLEER Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Picture blurry
    Posted: 05 Jul 2011 at 10:43pm
Why when I take this pic, did it come out blurry? it happens all the time.
Indicator light says it found focus.. I'm spot metering the eye, holding shutter and re-composing.. I plug into PC and I get this????

Settings:

f 1/8
ISO 100
Metering Spot
Manual mode
Shutter speed 1/49



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Edited by JLEER - 05 Jul 2011 at 10:44pm
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horizon View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote horizon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Jul 2011 at 11:29pm
G'day John,

If you have focused on the childs eye and the foreground is in focus, but child is OOF you may be experiencing front focus on your camera & lens (this is not uncommon and may require some micro adjustment). Was this taken with autofocus or manual focus?

Also F1.8 is going to be a very shallow DoF and the closer you are to the subject the more shallow it becomes. IE Subject distance 1meter 50mm F1.8 DoF is about 2.74cm. If you use a smart phone, look for a Depth of Field Calculator for it and it will help you understand how to calculate the DoF required and what Fstop to use. After a while, it become second nature and you make a fairly close guess.

What camera are you using and does it give you a preview of the shot before you take it to see exposures and how it's framed? It's also possible that the camera focues on the foreground as the camera may be setup for wide focus and one focus point was selected by the camera, which was the foreground.

Also it must have been fairly low light for it to require such a slow shutter speed at F1.8. You may have moved slightly and it's better to use a tripod for this low light situation.

Regards,
Craig
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Post Options Post Options   Quote JLEER Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Jul 2011 at 12:51am
Here's another shot I did with same settings and it's in focus.. so I'm confused.

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I think you nailed it Craig.. The shot above I was closer and it's clear. Maybe I was just too far away. Yer the man!

Thanks alot for the tips!

Johnny

Edited by JLEER - 06 Jul 2011 at 12:56am
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Post Options Post Options   Quote JLEER Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Jul 2011 at 1:02am
Originally posted by horizon

G'day John,

If you have focused on the childs eye and the foreground is in focus, but child is OOF you may be experiencing front focus on your camera & lens (this is not uncommon and may require some micro adjustment). Was this taken with autofocus or manual focus?

Also F1.8 is going to be a very shallow DoF and the closer you are to the subject the more shallow it becomes. IE Subject distance 1meter 50mm F1.8 DoF is about 2.74cm. If you use a smart phone, look for a Depth of Field Calculator for it and it will help you understand how to calculate the DoF required and what Fstop to use. After a while, it become second nature and you make a fairly close guess.

What camera are you using and does it give you a preview of the shot before you take it to see exposures and how it's framed? It's also possible that the camera focues on the foreground as the camera may be setup for wide focus and one focus point was selected by the camera, which was the foreground.

Also it must have been fairly low light for it to require such a slow shutter speed at F1.8. You may have moved slightly and it's better to use a tripod for this low light situation.

Regards,
Craig


Also, yes it has preview shots.. They looked clear on my camera. lol
I have canon 40D and I'm now looking at a DOF calculator.. How did you get 2.74cm? I'm getting this.

Subject distance       10 cm

Depth of field
Near limit       10 cm
Far limit       10 cm
Total       0 cm

In front of subject       0 cm (50%)
Behind subject       0 cm (50%)

Hyperfocal distance       21350.1 cm
Circle of confusion       0.019 mm

and in FEET I get this..

Subject distance      10 ft

Depth of field
Near limit      9.86 ft
Far limit      10.1 ft
Total      0.28 ft

In front of subject      0.14 ft (49%)
Behind subject      0.14 ft (51%)

Hyperfocal distance      700.5 ft
Circle of confusion      0.019 mm

http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html

Edited by JLEER - 06 Jul 2011 at 1:03am
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Post Options Post Options   Quote horizon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Jul 2011 at 2:45am
G'day John,

No worries.

In the results that you have shown, I dont see what the lens focal length is and the Fstop.

I use the Depth of Fiel Calc on my phone and I just put in an aps-c camera model, guessed lens focal length and guessed the distance from subject and fstop you mentioned above.

I also was guessing the distance from subject as 1mt (3ft approx). With using the 10ft distance (3mt) it's about the same that you got in your DoF calc results.

Regards,
Craig
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Post Options Post Options   Quote JLEER Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Jul 2011 at 3:20am
Originally posted by horizon

G'day John,

No worries.

In the results that you have shown, I dont see what the lens focal length is and the Fstop.

I use the Depth of Fiel Calc on my phone and I just put in an aps-c camera model, guessed lens focal length and guessed the distance from subject and fstop you mentioned above.

I also was guessing the distance from subject as 1mt (3ft approx). With using the 10ft distance (3mt) it's about the same that you got in your DoF calc results.

Regards,
Craig


I Craig, I did Canon 40D 85mm Focal Length F 1.8 10 feet.

I get this.. Subject distance       10 ft

Depth of field
Near limit       9.86 ft
Far limit       10.1 ft
Total       0.28 ft

In front of subject       0.14 ft (49%)
Behind subject       0.14 ft (51%)

Hyperfocal distance       700.5 ft
Circle of confusion       0.019 mm

I don't really understand what this means.. So according to this how far should I be from them? 10feet? or 9.86 I'm confused

Edited by JLEER - 06 Jul 2011 at 3:20am
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Post Options Post Options   Quote horizon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Jul 2011 at 6:58am
G'day John,

With the DoF calc you should be able to tell it how far you want to be from your subject at a given focal length and fstop and work out the DoF. Basically what it showing is how shallow DoF f1.8 is. If you change the DoF to say f2.8 - f4 it will change the DoF at the same distance.

Using a very shallow DoF in portraits would give the subjects eye sharp but ears and not soft - blurred.

If you really want to see the actual effect, grab a tape measure stretch it out on a table, with your 85mm lens, focus on a particular point in the middle somewhere (use a tripod if you have one) and then proceed to take a few shots focused on the same point, but changing the fstop. You will begin to see the DoF change in front and back of the focus point. Changing from a shallow to deeper DoF.

Others here who do portraiture would be more apt to advise what fstop they use, as I generally dont photograph people.

Some people like an extreme shallow DoF, and others prefer to see the subject sharp and just the background OOF.

Hope this helps

Regards,
Craig

Edited by horizon - 06 Jul 2011 at 7:00am
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Post Options Post Options   Quote JLEER Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Jul 2011 at 9:17pm
Thank you very much Craig.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote CSkinner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Jul 2011 at 9:15am
Hi John,

Looks like Craig has provided a nice bit of information :)The first thing I noticed when looking at the settings you used was the shutter speed - 1/49 is quite a slow shutter speed for a portrait shot. When I was having some tuition I was told you cannot really prevent the camera shake with a shutter speed under around 1/80th or 1/60th. I would try bumping up the ISO to 200-250 and a shutter speed of around 1/100th and see if that helps. Ideally you want somewhere between 1/160th and 1/250th but of course it depends on the situation and available lighting. In this case it doesn't really look like camera shake is the reason, but nevertheless it may still help. Hope it helps.

Cheers

Chris

Edited by CSkinner - 07 Jul 2011 at 9:16am
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Post Options Post Options   Quote JLEER Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Jul 2011 at 4:08pm
I'll take all the advice I can get. Thanks Chris
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